July 11, 2022

Too much is never good: how the “healthy” HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) can turn into a bad risk

A big prospective, multicenter, cohort study, conducted in the UK and the USA with 14.478 CAD (cardiac artery disease) patients with a median follow-up of 6.7 (UK) to 8.9 (USA) years has shown that very high HDL-c paradoxically are associated with higher mortality in individuals with CAD. This was also the case with low HDL-c levels. Normally HDL-c is considered to have a protective role with concern to CAD in opposite to the “bad” LDL-c. A higher HDL-c thus is associated with a lower CAD risk. However, as it appears now a very high HDL-c shows a complete different picture and is a big risk for mortality in CAD patients. In a recent presentation at the European congress of Internal Medicine ( ECIM) from Spain a 10-year follow-up of 1.849.087 workers with a mean age of 36.7 years, 67.8 % men, was reported. It was investigated how low and high HDL-c were associated with the development of a malignant neoplasm. In this large group of working people the risk of neoplasia (fatal or not) in indivuals with extreme HDL-c appeared to be much higher (5 times) than in the group with average HDL-c. In the group with a low HDL-c […]
July 11, 2022

Moderate coffee intake is associated with lower mortality regardless of whether sugar is added

Demographic, clinical and lifestyle data were collected by the UK Biobank over the course of a year between 2009 and 2012. 171.616 adults without underlying heart disease or cancer at the start of the study did participate. Questions about the use of coffee were included. The data were analyzed and the patients were classified according to their usual coffee drinking habit. Participants (average age 55.6 years) were followed during up to 7 years. When compared to non-coffee drinkers, those who drank unsweetened coffee regularly in any amount were 16 to 21 % less likely to die. Adults who drank moderate amounts of coffee sweetened with sugar ( 1 teaspoon, 1,5 – 3,5 cups per day) were 29 to 31 % less likely to die. Results were inconclusive for those who added artificial sweeteners to their coffee. This was an observational study and may have missed important factors. Confounding variables such as differences in socioeconomic status, diet, and other lifestyle factors may impact findings. Coffee drinking patterns were from over a decade before in a country where many drink tea. So a comparison with other countries might not be easy. The average amount of daily sugar per cup of coffee is […]
July 11, 2022

Why Iodine is important for you and your thyroid

Why do you need iodine in your food? Which food does contain iodine? What happens if you are iodine deficient? How much do you need? These are important questions because without sufficient amounts of iodine in the food your thyroid can not function normally and this has consequences. Both thyroid hormones thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronin (T3) do contain iodine (iodide) 4 and 3 molecules respectively. Without iodine no thyroid hormone can be synthesised and consequently hypothyroidism and/or goitre may develop. In case of endemic iodine deficiency even cretinism can occur. The recommended daily intake is 150 µg for an adult and a child aged 13 years or older. During pregnancy and lactation more iodine intake is required: respectively 200-250 µg and 250- 290 µg daily. It is not easy to measure on an individual basis whether a person is taking enough iodine. Iodine used to be incorpated in table salt, but with decreasing intake of salt other ways have been sought to deliver iodine. In many countries iodine is added to the salt used in the production of bread (in some countries already since many decades). Other high-iodine content foods are: fish/seafood, eggs, milk and other dairy foods. Vegans and […]
September 27, 2022
Black tea might be good for your health!

Black tea might be good for your health!

A UK study was conducted among half a million people, all participants in a large cohort study called “UK Biobank” from 2006 and 2010. Dietary questionnaires were administered at enrollment and during follow-up of median 11.2 years about tea-drinking habits, specifically about the number of cups of tea and other drinks and also about drinking the tea very hot, hot or warm. Information on death and cause of death were also gathered from the participants. Eighty five percent of the participants reported tea drinking, 89 % of those who reported tea type drank black tea. When compared to non-tea drinkers, those who took 2 or more cups daily had 9 to 13 % lower risk for CVD and other mortality. Tea drinking had a beneficial effect on mortality regardless of whether they drank coffee or not. Adding milk or sugar to tea and altered (lowered) caffeine metabolism rate did nor affect the results. Unmeasured confounding factors could influence tea-drinking behavior and the risk of death, but probably did not attenuate the associations found. The findings of this study suggest that (black) tea drinking may be associated with modestly lower mortality. There is no definitive proof that tea drinking directly reduced […]